Suzanne Bee

 

Encaustic on Wood Panel

 

Biography
 

       Suzanne B. is a California artist-art instructor known for her inspirational teaching style and her uniquely sensual, yet contemplative encaustic paintings.

 

        Since the time Suzanne could hold a crayon, she’s been exploring unique and fun ways to combine such mediums as watercolors, acrylics, mosaics and encaustics. Suzanne participated in an encaustic painting class in 2001 and fell in love with the versatility of this ancient art form.  She now creates only in this magical medium. Suzanne says “Some of my favorite things about encaustics are that I get to use a blow torch; I also love the hint of honey in the air and how the colorful melted wax lends itself to a playful expression.”

 

        Suzanne was born and raised in the Northern California Sierras and although, she is inspired by her beautiful surroundings her paintings truly come from within and follow a free-flowing approach. She creates from her imagination starting with a color scheme, later evolving into a rhythmic motion attempting to capture a mood in time.

 

        After completing her Bachelor's Degree in Psychology and an Associates Degree in Design and Marketing her focus became the education of others. Suzanne has been teaching art for over 25 years and currently offers classes at Crocker Art Museum, Sierra College and teaches a Youth Art Academy in her studio/gallery in Sacramento.

 

        Throughout her life she has developed as a professional artist having numerous collectors nationwide.

Encaustic Painting

 

        Encaustic is an ancient medium meaning-Encaustikos“to burn in”. Three thousand years ago Greek shipbuilders discovered a new use for the beeswax they used to caulk the hulls. By adding pigments for color and resin for hardness, they created a painting medium with an unusual depth and luminosity. Before long, encaustic art could be found everywhere, from painted ships to depictions of everyday life on urns, even applied to family statuary to render a lifelike glow.

        A thousand years after the Greeks discovered it, painters from Egypt resurrected the medium, crafting exquisite portraits to decorate their patron mummies. The modern resurgence of encaustic painting began in the early 20th century. Diego Rivera began painting with encaustics in the 1920’s and in the 1950’s Jasper Johns further popularized its use.

        Encaustics durability is due to the fact that beeswax is impervious to moisture. It will withstand time; it will not yellow, fade, darken and does not need to be protected by glass. Polish once a month with a soft cloth and see it shine.

        The magic of this ancient art form consists of beeswax, tree resin, and colored pigment; applied hot with a paintbrush, each layer of wax is fused together with a blowtorch creating beautiful luminescent works of art. The result is a painting uniquely translucent, with a lush surface that is simultaneously sensual and contemplative.